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(@thegdolla)
Posts: 34
Eminent Member
Topic starter
 

nickzeptepi wrote: Bump

May I suggest a slightly different approach, one which can be more inclusive and allow more flexibility for people who may like to participate in such a good endeavour but may find a variety of obstacles perhaps in sticking to a schedule or affordability.

To allow people to go at their own pace & cover books they've already read I offer:-
The THC Book Review Club

The reader writes up a proper review essay that covers a main synopsis, 4-6 paragraphs ( maybe more) on the main topics/reasoning/evidence etc. And a personal reflection on how it helped/impacted them. If this is a bit much then maybe just a good summary & reflection.

I can get behind that as an alternative. At least until I am able to commit more time to the original endeavour. Ill look into getting a thread or forum set up.

 
Posted : August 29, 2017 2:44 AM
nickzeptepi
(@nickzeptepi)
Posts: 474
Honorable Member
 

To get the ball rolling

Tracy Twyman - Genuflect

https://www.amazon.com/Genuflect-Tracy-R-Twyman/dp/1521491445
The ebook is a bargain in comparison to the print.

This was a fascinating read.
Knowing that it was a fictional tale to spin all the different avenues of her research together made it a real page turner and intriguing, I kept wanting to know what might happen next and pondering over which bits were completely made up or based on her research.

Some of the detailed descriptions of the rituals of debauched sex, murder and demonology made a churning pit in my stomach. Maybe it was also the style of descriptive writing without the fanciful prose or superfluous language common to a lot of fiction that kept me wanting to know more.

It also gave me a few aha… moments when it filled in the gaps or joined a few dots on a few of the things I was researching.

There's a ton of information in here, and it's much easier to read than a solid fact based dry as sawdust research book.

If you are at all interested in any of Tracy’s work and/or Archons, Saturn Theory, EU, Greek & Roman mythology, Magic rituals, Freemasons, British Royals. Then give this a whirl.

 
Posted : September 3, 2017 11:32 AM
(@highersidetoph)
Posts: 10
Active Member
 

I've picked up a few books that I've heard referenced on the show. Gordon Wight's Chaos Protocols and his Starships are both great books. Protocols has a bunch of great tips and spells for making life taste better. Starships is a mind expanding look at the unknown history of humanity and spirituality.
I also picked up David Paulides' Missing 411 Weatern Edition. Lots of great, mysterious, intriguing stories have been crammed into a rapid fire style book that's very easy to read and comprehend.
I'm really looking forward to diving into some books on the hollow earth, the electric universe, and conciousness. I'd love to hear some suggestions from you guys if anyone has read some books from guests on the show. Thanks!

 
Posted : September 6, 2017 7:00 PM
enjoypolo
(@enjoypolo)
Posts: 1353
Member Moderator
 

Since I had a lot of time on my last travel, I took it upon myself to read Living Energies by Callum Coats, on the works of Viktor Schauberger and his profound insights on Nature and Water. The book (320pages with many illustrations) is a great introductory summary of the Austrian naturalist and inventor Viktor Schaubeger (1885-1958). Callum Coats, the author, did a great job translating, compiling and presenting a coherent overview of the maverick, which is no easy feat, especially more so because Schauberger didn't come from a mainstream techno-academic background, but got many of his insights whilst working as a forester in Nature.

The book starts with a brief intro on the man and his life, including his forced labour for the Nazis in WW2 and the Post-WW2 era. It then goes through a lengthy description on what energy is, the different types of energies and polarities.

In particular, Schauberger's view was that our current modern machines based on explosive, outward (or centrifugal) motion is directed towards the polarities of death (entropy). Whereas Nature uses the opposite polarity of Life, of ectropy (aka negentropy) based on over-unity growth, increasing order and efficiency. An interesting point to mention, is that at the centre between those two extremities, lying in the middle, is referred to as the perpetual uniform motion (100% efficiency), where growth is unchanging and uniform (like an infinite circular motion). While it may seem optimal at first, this is the point of non-growth and so isn't desirable either. My understanding is that this is akin to repetitive motion with no gain (nor loss) and thus is undesirable (like a child that never grows, in a perpetual state of stagnation).

In fact, Schauberger's books and notes are littered with such deep, metaphysical reflections on the nature of Being, and I have decided to skim through them here, not the least because of my lack of understanding, but also for the sake of length. There are other fascinating questions he is posing himself, such as the Sun not being our causal source of heat, which is sure to step on a lot of people's feet, but at the same time jive with Inner-Earth lore (and Hollow Earth theories). This alone made for an insightful read that's worth the time and effort to try and understand.

Of course, one of the book's foremost principle is the spiralling-vortex (whirlpool) motion of energy that is ubiquitous in Nature across all scales.
An incredible demonstration of this principle is illustrated in Schauberger's Log Flume he built for the Austrian royalty. Precisely, he had built an artificial stream to transport logs by mimicking the curving motion of the natural streams, and by using the principles of vortex motion. I'll post some pictures below that illustrate the concept much clearer than I could ever put together with words.
A crucial component of water that's emphasized throughout the book, is the temperature. Specifically, water at +4ºC being the optimal condition (and densest) for creating a powerful spiral in the middle. This is what Gerald Pollack calls the Fourth Phase of Water. But I digress.
Just this discovery alone is such a fascinating insight that's worthy of a new Manhattan Project.
To make it short, this allowed for not only a very fast method of transportation, but the logs never even touched the walls, thereby reducing wood damage and increasing the profits for the Royalty.

This being just the tip of the proverbial iceberg, the book goes on to dedicate 5 or more chapters on The Sun, The Hydrological Cycle, The dynamics of flow, The Metabolism of Trees and Agriculture and Soil Fertility. I could spend hours just to attempt at describing these passages, but needless to say, Schauberger has a very hollistic understanding of the natural eco-system that really opens the eyes on things that I've often taken for granted (rivers, trees, flow of water).

Last but not least, I think one of the most fascinating chapters was the careful analysis of the Stationary Trout and the insight that leads to Shape, Temperature and Motion being fundamental components of energy. In fact, the understanding of the stationary trout led him to design a submarine-type vessel that would effortlessly and efficiently explore the oceans with almost unlimited supply of energy. It's also an insight that's used in electro-gravitic type propulsion systems such as described by Mark McCandlish about the Fluxliner. At the best of my understanding, the propulsion is initiated due to a vacuuming-effect via vortexes created by the fish tail, and through the water passing by the gills (de-oxyginated) creating an upward push of the vacuum. This creates a positive feedback loop (over-unity) whereby the more water, the more energy propelling the fish/vessel (The analogy of the soap-bar being squeezed out of your hand and going forward).
I subsequently tried watching trouts swimming upwards on Youtube, and its fascinating to see them not just burst out of the water and jump, but literally staying for a few seconds halfway through the waterfall, overcoming the huge counter-current.

So to finish this, this book inspired me in many ways, partly because of how elemental and universal Water is, but also because it made me realize how little I knew about it. I've always been mesmerized by water, whether its waves at the ocean, the whirlpool in a glass, or the flow of milk in a cup of coffee. Ultimately, I think the workings of the microcosm are reflections at the macro-scales. These principles could also lead to a quantum leap in providing clean, healthy fresh water to everyone, as well using implosion-based machines to generate abundant energy (More about that in the book, and also related to John W. Keely's inventions as well) and last but not least, taking care of our own sentient Planet. I highly recommend the book Living Energies, and also recommend the great episode with Shamangineer (Water Alchemy, August 2017) which I think is great primer for the topic addressing not only Schauberger's work but his contemporaries such as Gerald Pollack.

Below are some memorable parts of the book I wished to share. As they say, a picture can be worth a thousand words.

EDIT: I also recommend this documentary Comprehend and Copy Nature, which was posted on this forum somewhere else.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyOGdjWDVM4

 
Posted : March 10, 2018 9:08 PM
(@hugh-johnson)
Posts: 57
Trusted Member
 

https://www.amazon.com/Inside-Out-Revolution-Thing-Change-Forever/dp/1401942415

Sort of like western Zen. I can't really describe it, but it seems brilliant.

 
Posted : March 13, 2018 2:36 PM
(@rikmcc)
Posts: 3
New Member
 

enjoypolo wrote: Since I had a lot of time on my last travel, I took it upon myself to read Living Energies by Callum Coats, on the works of Viktor Schauberger and his profound insights on Nature and Water. The book (320pages with many illustrations) is a great introductory summary of the Austrian naturalist and inventor Viktor Schaubeger (1885-1958). Callum Coats, the author, did a great job translating, compiling and presenting a coherent overview of the maverick, which is no easy feat, especially more so because Schauberger didn't come from a mainstream techno-academic background, but got many of his insights whilst working as a forester in Nature.

The book starts with a brief intro on the man and his life, including his forced labour for the Nazis in WW2 and the Post-WW2 era. It then goes through a lengthy description on what energy is, the different types of energies and polarities.

In particular, Schauberger's view was that our current modern machines based on explosive, outward (or centrifugal) motion is directed towards the polarities of death (entropy). Whereas Nature uses the opposite polarity of Life, of ectropy (aka negentropy) based on over-unity growth, increasing order and efficiency. An interesting point to mention, is that at the centre between those two extremities, lying in the middle, is referred to as the perpetual uniform motion (100% efficiency), where growth is unchanging and uniform (like an infinite circular motion). While it may seem optimal at first, this is the point of non-growth and so isn't desirable either. My understanding is that this is akin to repetitive motion with no gain (nor loss) and thus is undesirable (like a child that never grows, in a perpetual state of stagnation).

In fact, Schauberger's books and notes are littered with such deep, metaphysical reflections on the nature of Being, and I have decided to skim through them here, not the least because of my lack of understanding, but also for the sake of length. There are other fascinating questions he is posing himself, such as the Sun not being our causal source of heat, which is sure to step on a lot of people's feet, but at the same time jive with Inner-Earth lore (and Hollow Earth theories). This alone made for an insightful read that's worth the time and effort to try and understand.

Of course, one of the book's foremost principle is the spiralling-vortex (whirlpool) motion of energy that is ubiquitous in Nature across all scales.
An incredible demonstration of this principle is illustrated in Schauberger's Log Flume he built for the Austrian royalty. Precisely, he had built an artificial stream to transport logs by mimicking the curving motion of the natural streams, and by using the principles of vortex motion. I'll post some pictures below that illustrate the concept much clearer than I could ever put together with words.
A crucial component of water that's emphasized throughout the book, is the temperature. Specifically, water at +4ºC being the optimal condition (and densest) for creating a powerful spiral in the middle. This is what Gerald Pollack calls the Fourth Phase of Water. But I digress.
Just this discovery alone is such a fascinating insight that's worthy of a new Manhattan Project.
To make it short, this allowed for not only a very fast method of transportation, but the logs never even touched the walls, thereby reducing wood damage and increasing the profits for the Royalty.

This being just the tip of the proverbial iceberg, the book goes on to dedicate 5 or more chapters on The Sun, The Hydrological Cycle, The dynamics of flow, The Metabolism of Trees and Agriculture and Soil Fertility. I could spend hours just to attempt at describing these passages, but needless to say, Schauberger has a very hollistic understanding of the natural eco-system that really opens the eyes on things that I've often taken for granted (rivers, trees, flow of water).

Last but not least, I think one of the most fascinating chapters was the careful analysis of the Stationary Trout and the insight that leads to Shape, Temperature and Motion being fundamental components of energy. In fact, the understanding of the stationary trout led him to design a submarine-type vessel that would effortlessly and efficiently explore the oceans with almost unlimited supply of energy. It's also an insight that's used in electro-gravitic type propulsion systems such as described by Mark McCandlish about the Fluxliner. At the best of my understanding, the propulsion is initiated due to a vacuuming-effect via vortexes created by the fish tail, and through the water passing by the gills (de-oxyginated) creating an upward push of the vacuum. This creates a positive feedback loop (over-unity) whereby the more water, the more energy propelling the fish/vessel (The analogy of the soap-bar being squeezed out of your hand and going forward).
I subsequently tried watching trouts swimming upwards on Youtube, and its fascinating to see them not just burst out of the water and jump, but literally staying for a few seconds halfway through the waterfall, overcoming the huge counter-current.

So to finish this, this book inspired me in many ways, partly because of how elemental and universal Water is, but also because it made me realize how little I knew about it. I've always been mesmerized by water, whether its waves at the ocean, the whirlpool in a glass, or the flow of milk in a cup of coffee. Ultimately, I think the workings of the microcosm are reflections at the macro-scales. These principles could also lead to a quantum leap in providing clean, healthy fresh water to everyone, as well using implosion-based machines to generate abundant energy (More about that in the book, and also related to John W. Keely's inventions as well) and last but not least, taking care of our own sentient Planet. I highly recommend the book Living Energies, and also recommend the great episode with Shamangineer (Water Alchemy, August 2017) which I think is great primer for the topic addressing not only Schauberger's work but his contemporaries such as Gerald Pollack.

Below are some memorable parts of the book I wished to share. As they say, a picture can be worth a thousand words.

EDIT: I also recommend this documentary Comprehend and Copy Nature, which was posted on this forum somewhere else.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyOGdjWDVM4

 
Posted : March 20, 2018 3:20 AM
(@rikmcc)
Posts: 3
New Member
 

Wow, that was a great overview I need this book asap;) thank you for posting the attachments as well, all great information! I've listened to the water alchemy episode with shamangineer and thought it was awesome! I've always felt a deep connection with water at a few springs I visit often in Florida where I've lived my entire life on the water. I just came back today from a 3 day camping trip where the water is pristine. I let my sons ashes go back to Mother Nature a beautiful river where he and I spent many nights camping. I've never been on the forum before and I find your synopsis first, Unbelievable, the gods are sending me signals! Synchronicity is real!!! Thank you again

 
Posted : March 20, 2018 3:37 AM
enjoypolo
(@enjoypolo)
Posts: 1353
Member Moderator
 


Title: Sub Rosa America and the fall of the New Atlantis (5-book series)
Author: Elana Freeland (from December 2017 THC Interview)
Available: Amazon
Amazon Synopsis:

Told from the perspective of 2019, when all the Earth is convulsing and the United States of America is collapsing due either to Nature taking back her own, or to a HAARP-driven error, or to a purposeful Tesla sabotage to force a new beginning, Sub Rosa America and the Fall of the New Atlantis is the occult history of the United States since November 22, 1963 that we all could have read years ago if we’d been on Route 66 cruising through a quantum Time field . . .

Book I, “Gone to Croatan,” revisits Sixties counterculture at the University of California at Santa Barbara just after the Bank of America has been burned to the ground. A tangled web of political intrigue generated by intelligence factions back East draws six protagonists together and forces a decision to flee into the Southwest desert where they will encounter a Mayan Timekeeper writing a chronicle of the fall of the New Atlantis.

I've been wanting to post a quick book review about Elana Freeland's novel series: Sub Rosa America and the fall of the New Atlantis. I was introduced to the author through the recent THC Episode, and I somehow clicked with the knowledge and wisdom she exhibited in the interview.

As a caveat, I'm not usually fond of reading novels, preferring instead non-fiction books. But I have to say, there was nothing more satisfying than being immersed in a dystopian world full of conspiracy lores with a very intricate story of esoteric, alchemic, and metaphysical twists taking place.

The author is clearly well-versed in all those topics mentioned, and though it's a book filled with passages requiring more than one reading, it's overall arc-story is not only entertaining, but in fact, it's eerily descriptive of the current social landscape in 2018. Fact is, most, if not all, the events happening in the book are actual, historically documented events.
Each new chapter begins with several quotes from authors and texts as diverse as Hernan Cortes, John Maynard Keynes, Rudolf Steiner or even the obscure text "Silent Weapons from Quiet Wars"(which is available on my cloud-stash).

My personal favourites from this book is the author's knowledge about John W Keely and Nikola Tesla's works (and others like the Stanford Research Institute, and MK Ultra, artichoke programs) demonstrating the kind of knowledge that makes my hair stand while reading.

I'm almost at the end of Book II and I can say without a doubt this is an awesome book that would make any conspiracy minded reader ecstatic. I bought the paperback versions, but it's also available in Kindle. The book also features an exhaustive glossary with many terms that could make up an encyclopedia esoterica just by itself.

Scientia est potentia..

 
Posted : March 20, 2018 9:49 PM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
Honorable Member
 

Aaaah,man. I would be all over a THC Book Club. There are those of us that still read for fun,ya know. Granted, most are THC+ members,but still;) Cheers!

 
Posted : April 16, 2018 2:59 AM
enjoypolo
(@enjoypolo)
Posts: 1353
Member Moderator
 

I just finished reading a book on a topic that's dear to me: Biomimicry, or how to turn to nature for problem-solving inspiration.
The book is called: The Shark's Paintbrush And How Nature Is Inspiring Innovation, by Jay Harman (Amazon link, 2014).
I first heard of Jay Harman whilst watching Youtube clips on Viktor Schauberger, aka The Water Wizard because.
It turns out Jay Harman, an Australian naturalist and wildlife conservationist in his youth, had discovered the same principles of recurring spiral geometries throughout nature, and had been inspired by Nature's simple, yet efficient technologies which ultimately led him to found PAX Water Technologies, including fans that look quite similar to those of Viktor Schauberger.
Being interested in observing Nature's patterns myself, I resonate with biomimic inventors. And although Jay Harman is no lone mad genius inventor like Viktor Schauberger, he's an inventor and savvy businessman who sees the infinite potential of growth, if only we can start to Be inspired by Nature's amazing patterns and implement them to create more efficient systems.

The book itself is 290-pages long divided into three main sections: First, an intro to the field with a few autobiographical anecdotes; Followed in the second part by illustrating a portfolio of various biomimicry inventions, including some fascinating examples which I'll get to in more details below. The third and final part is focused on implementing biomimicry principles in your business or organization, or creating a business around a biomimic idea, which turned out far more inspiring than I expected it to be.

So what do biomimicry ideas look like? The second chapter starts with sharks. Harman goes on to describe the numerous inventions and designs that have been inspired by the efficiency with which sharks swim through water, from the way the body moves effortlessly by creating vortices, as well as the surface of water he skin with its many, tiny ridges and scales that make it resistant to micro-organisms growing on the surface. This led to the invention of the Sharklet Paint which if applied to huge ships could save a tremendous amount of fuel wasted each year.

Another example, are whale flippers that inspired better, more aerodynamic propellers for wind turbines. Without going to too many details, I'll post a top 3 of the most interesting applications, at least for me.
EDIT 14/6/18: I recently noticed a maple tree's iconic helicopter seed leaves look just like a whale's flipper. And in fact, it makes perfect sense wouldn't it? A Whale uses vortices in the water to move smoothlessly, and so does the maple leaf to propagate in the air as efficiently as possible. Just thought I'd add my 2 cents 🙂

3. The Honeycomb shape inspired by bees: I find the hexagonal shape fascinating with its link to sacred geometry (vector equilibrium), as well as being the most balanced design (most efficient to fractalize I guess, or think flower of life). Numerous examples inspired by this shape are seen in architecture, as well, as its application in nanotechnology (think carbon-structure of molecules of water in tetrahedral/hexagonal shapes).

2. Mycelium and fungi. I had recently attended a conference by the mycologist Paul Stamets who came to my attention following his appearance on Joe Rogan Podcast but that’s a whole story by itself. Paul Stamets was featured here as well.
It turns out that mycelium, which are the hair-thin roots of fungi that grow in massive inter-connected networks that develop in the soil, are formed in exactly the same way as neurons in the brain; the digital nodes of computers on the Internet, or even galaxies and stars in the Universe. In other words, the fractal and holographic principle of the Universe is expressed in the way fungi grow, which includes the principles of taking the path of least resistance for energy transfer. So following this, a team of Japanese researchers have figured out the most efficient pathways for the Tokyo Railway System by growing fungi on a map of Japan, with a piece of oat flakes on each city (where the fungi would be attracted to feed itself). And the result was a map outlining the path of least resistance, and the most effective way for railway routes to take.
This in my view, is a perfect example of how biomimic solutions can create very simple, demonstrable (and cheap) experiments, with overwhelmingly powerful application.

1. This isn't so much new, but it still boggles my mind. And that's the peacock's feathers (or the butterfly's wings) and particularly their pigment-less wings. That's right, the feathers of a peacock don't contain any pigments at all, but instead have very tiny ridges (on the micron-scale) that absorb and reflect a specific wavelength of light, thus resulting in what we may commonly perceive as green or blue. But in fact, there are no blue or green pigments at all. So basically, the geometric structure alone can create the experience of colours.
Similarly, a Japanese company Teijin developed a product called ChromaFlair that's a paint using the same principles, resulting in a iridescent paint-job ideal for applying on cars, but also to create pigment-less clothing (so saving resources on the dying process, which if chemical, is very hazardous to the environment as well).

Another great biomimic is the structure of lotus plants' leaves which make water drops fall along and collect dust (kind of like a gortex fabric) and can be applied to buildings with self-cleaning capabilities (save on maintenance costs as well).

The final chapter is focused on getting those ideas out there, and applying them in your organization. As I said previously, I found this chapter quite inspiring because of Jay Harman's experience in building up many companies from the ground-up, especially in a field where many scientists and engineers are reluctant to change their ideas (aka dogmatic material sciences) or straight up, and I quote, think science shits on Nature.

So to finish this summary, I think it was a sensible and insightful read for anyone who's into biomimicry or is inclined in new inventions.

Personally, the crazier the theories, the more I'm inclined to indulge. Examples range from Viktor Schauberger's ideas to Grebennikov and his flying machines inspired by insects (and bees), or even Nikola Tesla whose first invention was a dynamo generated by beetles. I think all those guys have immense merits who have been pushed aside by nefarious forces. So while Jay Harman doesn't venture into the 'crazies' territory, he has created (and demonstrated) very practical applications that are all nature inspired. And he is not shy to proclaim that the science will be biomimetic (illustrated by the increasing number of patents using biomimicry solutions). An interesting anecdote at the end of the book related to when he was called by the Pentagon to demonstrate his efficient propeller design, and how getting in the hands of the military-industrial-complex can put an end to your career (by having your patents confiscated and classified indefinitely). But I digress.
Good read, more on the down-to-earth side, but still very entertaining. It just shows how all the roads to free energy and clean propulsion are already amongst us, everywhere we look around. I posted some of the useful resources and pictures below in case you're interested. Peace!

Resources:

Creating a Bio-Industrial Revolution (TED) | Janine Benyus

General information of Biomimicry.
https://biomimicry.org/biomimicry-examples/

AskNature.org - A repository for many biomimicry inventions and a platform.
https://asknature.org

 
Posted : April 20, 2018 4:02 AM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
Honorable Member
 

OooooooooOoh, this one looks delicious~

 
Posted : April 20, 2018 4:43 AM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
Honorable Member
 

For Book Description: See the "Anyone Used Magic To Grow Their Business?" Thread in the THC Entrepreneur forum=)
& I bet many of you remember this one. It's probably sitting on your bookshelf right now =)

 
Posted : April 29, 2018 9:08 PM
enjoypolo
(@enjoypolo)
Posts: 1353
Member Moderator
 

It's funny how ever-since I started reading Dean Radin's latest book Real Magic (the subject of a recent THC episode) the Hermetic philosophy, the Kybalion, keeps popping up in my horizon. It's a weird mix of synchronicity and magic (perhaps too sides of the same coin). I would definitely want to do due diligence on the Kybalion in the future.
While I'm at it, I would highly recommend Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern Science and Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe.
I've read quite a few books about ESP and Remote Viewing (from the same group of people, notably Russel Targ & Puthoff) but Dean Radin really has a knack for entertaining read packed with information, without making it dull to read. It's concise and on-point, just enough to make the uninitiated curious about the reality/potential of a magical universe paradigm.
Big fan of the NOETIC Institute and the Society for Scientific Exploration (William Bengston). Two platforms to bring magical science at the forefront of research and development using scientific approach.

 
Posted : May 3, 2018 6:21 PM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
Honorable Member
 

**doouble like
LOVE IT! The Kybalion has a strange & mysterious way of being a book that crosses your path offering some higher understandings & primers. It was gifted to me waaaaaaay back in the day by a beloved "guru"(of sorts) & gifting it has been one of those traditions kept dutifully to this day.
Sheesh, I must've given away 10,000 copies of this little hardcover book over the years!?!?! -Blazing in the High Desert Like A Hermetic Jehovah's Witness....hahahahahah-

It is definitely worth your time, Enjoypolo =D Fasten yo' seatbelts,baby...hyperspace ahead!

 
Posted : May 5, 2018 3:50 PM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
Honorable Member
 

**pops his head out of a old-school locker
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKHg0np9roM
Heeeeey EnjoyPolo,

Do you have a reeally special book, perhaps from your childhood, that influenced your
thinking profoundly in your adult life? Maybe more than one?
I would be interested to know what influenced you most.

P.S. maybe I missed it in the thread somewhere

 
Posted : May 5, 2018 10:19 PM
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