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Nerding out over permaculture

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enjoypolo
(@enjoypolo)
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Teratiodllama wrote:
just a helpful hint for those of us that live where there are seasons. Last year when that big box store who’s favorite color is orange put all of their plants on sale because fall was on its way, we bought a metric crap ton of fruit bearing trees with no intention of planting them at the time of purchase . (for us thats apples, plums, cherries, peaches. I’m not sure what they have on offer in warmer places) we transplanted them all into much larger pots than they came in, stuck them in the garage once the frost hit, hung grow lights, and spent the winter in an indoor forest. Once it got warm enough to plant them this year, we put them in the ground. So instead of paying 50$ per tree, we paid around 20$ per tree. The stores also, almost always have pallets that they need to get rid of, which is a good and cheap source of building materials. All you have to do is ask a manager about them. Use the pallets to keep the plants off the cement during the winter, then break them down and build raised beds with them in the spring.

Great advice! I recently saw something that blew my mind: grafting dozens of varieties onto one tree that produces apple, plums, peach, pear, etc.
I knew of grafting as a method, but never really delved into it. It's fascinating, a really doesn't seem too complicated either.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ik3l4U_17bI

 
Posted : July 7, 2021 5:52 PM
personman
(@personman)
Posts: 37
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Teratiodllama wrote:
just a helpful hint for those of us that live where there are seasons. Last year when that big box store who’s favorite color is orange put all of their plants on sale because fall was on its way, we bought a metric crap ton of fruit bearing trees with no intention of planting them at the time of purchase . (for us thats apples, plums, cherries, peaches. I’m not sure what they have on offer in warmer places) we transplanted them all into much larger pots than they came in, stuck them in the garage once the frost hit, hung grow lights, and spent the winter in an indoor forest. Once it got warm enough to plant them this year, we put them in the ground. So instead of paying 50$ per tree, we paid around 20$ per tree. The stores also, almost always have pallets that they need to get rid of, which is a good and cheap source of building materials. All you have to do is ask a manager about them. Use the pallets to keep the plants off the cement during the winter, then break them down and build raised beds with them in the spring.

What you did sounds pretty awesome (especially the indoor forest part) but for those looking for a lower cost solution, fall is a great time to plant fruit trees. Any of them that work for your environment will survive the winter in dormancy and then spring back to life when its warm enough. And you don't usually have to worry about watering the young transplants in the winter

 
Posted : July 7, 2021 6:18 PM
Teratiodllama
(@teratiodllama)
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personman wrote:
What you did sounds pretty awesome (especially the indoor forest part) but for those looking for a lower cost solution, fall is a great time to plant fruit trees. Any of them that work for your environment will survive the winter in dormancy and then spring back to life when its warm enough. And you don't usually have to worry about watering the young transplants in the winter

I was more concerned with all the deer stripping the wee ones down to nothing. I should have been a bit more specific for my reasoning. Thank you for being that to my attention. Also yes the indoor forest was effing amazing, so much so that it has turned into an interior protect. We now are attempting to have mini forests in every room of our house (bonsai trees), and by the end of summer, have a moss wall in a couple of the main rooms inside the home.

 
Posted : July 7, 2021 8:00 PM
Teratiodllama
(@teratiodllama)
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enjoypolo wrote:
Great advice! I recently saw something that blew my mind: grafting dozens of varieties onto one tree that produces apple, plums, peach, pear, etc.
I knew of grafting as a method, but never really delved into it. It's fascinating, a really doesn't seem too complicated either.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ik3l4U_17bI

Like Dr. Frankenstein but with more fruit and less murder. I approve this message

 
Posted : July 8, 2021 5:36 PM
Alogan
(@alogan)
Posts: 2
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@Teratiodllama

Love the sound of what you're doing! What state/growing zone are you in? If you haven't already, you should start a thread on your set up in the permaculture section.

Would love to check out your systems!

 
Posted : July 9, 2021 6:41 PM
Teratiodllama
(@teratiodllama)
Posts: 29
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I’m in Mid Michigan so it’s a cross between 5 and 6.
anything in particular that you would like to see? The indoor forest has been moved to the yard, and all the bonsai trees are still sprout/saplings (it takes about 5yrs for one to fully mature) so it might not be as exciting as you’re hoping, but I am willing to share.

 
Posted : July 12, 2021 3:20 PM
Jeframpton
(@jeframpton)
Posts: 28
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Amazing topic and with a lot of cool ideas. I wish I was on an owned property with an ability to build something but it’s got to be baby steps. Something I’ve noticed that has become overwhelmingly beneficial is worm castings. If you don’t have some worms you should look into it. Once it’s dialed in, your getting pounds of worms castings a week and doubling your numbers. 1 part peat/coco 1 part castings and some perlite and you have a solid potting mix. Runoff and some castings is the base for cannabis nutrient teas. Biodynamics and alchemical horticulture will be the future.
I’m thinking I could yield a profit off potted herbs next spring but we’ll see. Great thread.

 
Posted : July 13, 2021 10:44 PM
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