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Anthony Patch Sep 15, 2017 | Akimondo's Rant

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akimondo
(@akimondo)
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I don't think this is needed, but here are some excerpts from article two that clearly show this man hasn't thought his ideas through very well:

"As the foremost non-military expert microwave weapons, remote viewing (psychic spying) and Psi-warfare, the author became aware of the microwave problem when he was targeted to stop his forthcoming book on remote viewing being released. This book on psychic spying, published by Century Books, is the first book by a scientist on the subject of Psi-warfare and the techniques the superpowers developed."

Yeah, yeah, tell a tall tale to sell more books. Sure. Except it completely ruins the point he tries to make about the oh-so-dangerous microwave weapons, as they apparently can't even stop a man from writing a book. And in all seriousness, if the book was really a problem, wouldn't "they" just have pointed a gun at his face?

“An example was Brighton police van, parked outside the Brighton Pavilion which was used to beam UHF and microwaves at vagrants to clear them from the area. All Brighton's city centres are bombarded with microwaves when vagrants congregate to make them so ill they have to flee.”

Okay, so there are two possibilities. Either the target is sick while beamed, in which case the van has to follow them continuously until they’re out of town. Suspicious, cost-inefficient and dumb as the “vagrant” is more likely to enter a mall or something similar than to leave town. The other possibility is that targets are beamed with such intensity they feel sick even if the beaming is discontinued. Well, then there is no incentive to go anywhere since they don’t know what’s going on and leaving doesn’t make them feel better.

“On Wednesday, 4th of February the author was passing Brighton Police station with a frequency counter which detects microwave weapons, and I detected a 452 MHz microwave beam being directed at two young offenders sitting on a wall opposite the station.”

This requires a surveillance system of camera and monitor, a person to watch the monitor, and, of course, a microwave weapon. Everyone is welcome to ballpark the cost of this set up at installation and then per day, keeping it manned and maintained over time. And all that just so people can be made to leave the vicinity of the police station. It’s absurd. And, clearly, this weapon is again quite inefficient as the “young offenders” sat around long enough for Tim Rifat to come along, notice what was happening and take the measurements. And who in their right mind thinks the police care about young people sitting on a wall?

 
Posted : October 17, 2017 12:43 AM
akimondo
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This is how cities actually manipulate people’s behavior in a cost-effective and non-ridiculous way:

The Camden Bench. Produced by UK company Factory Furniture, the bench is designed to deter use for sleeping, littering, skateboarding, drug dealing, graffiti and theft.

And this is how homeless people are actually kept from seeking shelter under bridges:

Also in a cost-effective, permanent and non-ridiculous way.

The closest thing to what is being described, that's really used, is probably this thing, called the Mosquito:

But this is a sound based system that is simply switched on or off, it doesn't require personnel to operate. And it's mostly used by store owners who, unlike police stations, have a reason to move unwanted loitering young people away from their vicinity.

 
Posted : October 17, 2017 12:49 AM
akimondo
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“This makes the troublesome high profile person, display manic or insane behaviour that discredits them. Examples of this technique are allegedly: David Icke, Fergie, Princess Diana…”

What is this nonsense? David Icke is “crazy” colloquially speaking because he believes in reptilian shapeshifters. But there is nothing clinically insane about him. He’s coherent, intelligent, well-mannered, and well-spoken. The man has sold-out Wimbledon Arena and has over 46, 000, 000 views on Youtube. He’s growing, not going away. And he has been seen as “crazy” since 1990, so has his brain been microwaved for 27 years, without him developing cancer or seeing other major health problems?

“…while another New Age group complained of eye damage, nausea and headaches brought on whenever they had a meeting, which may have been caused by microwaves.”

I can see the shadowy NWO types in their secret lair:
Agent: “Sir, that New Age group is back.”
Villain: “What?”
Agent: “I’m afraid it’s true, sir.”
Villain: “These New Agers, they’ll be the end of us…”
Agent: “Yes, sir, they’re a big problem, especially when they… meet.”
Villain: “Meetings, meetings, always with the meetings. Did they have crystals?”
Agent: “They did. And incense. They… they even chanted the dreaded aum.”
Villain: “By Lucifer’s beard, not the aum! The Maharshi effect generated by their group meditations is going to paralyze us for weeks. We must stop them.”
Agent: “But how, sir? What are we going to do against a foe as formidable as the New Agers?”
Villain: “Whatever it takes, agent. Whatever it takes…”
Agent: “You mean—”
Villain: “Yes, dammit! Microwave their meetings.”
Agent: “All of them, sir?”
Villain: “Every last one. This world isn’t big enough for both the NWO and the New Agers.”

I’m just going to go ahead and say that this never ever happened, not even a little. In fact, even if the many worlds hypothesis turns out to be true, this still didn’t happen. It really is that stupid.

“In synthetic telepathy, the weak electromagnetic signals in the brain associated with subvocalised thought, are connected to a computer by use of electrodes, or in more advanced mechanisms by MASER beams.”

It took me surprisingly long to confirm, but yes, MASERS can be used for spectroscopy. And spectroscopy can be used for brain imaging. That, however, still looks like this:

“Synthetic telepathy detects the l5Hz, 5 milliwatt auditory cortex brain emissions, that are linked with the excitation potentials in the brain associated with subvocalised thought."

I strongly doubt that anyone can measure 0,005 watts from across the street, through one or more walls, inside the body of a moving target. This handheld Multi-functional Full-range RF Wireless Signal Radio Detector can detect 5 mW at a distance of about 1 inch, at an MHz level (where photons have 1,000,000 times the energy of the ELF photons of the Hz level). So, personally, I'll go with no. Until I hear from a better source than Mr. Patch, who believes in the Bible, and Tim Rifat, who believes he's a Psi-Lord.

Also there are the problems with accents, individual differences, multilingual people, and the fact that far from all thinking uses subvocal speech at all. In fact, as soon as someone goes on autopilot or does anything physical that they're familiar with, that's it, no more subvocal speech (in relation to what they're doing). Also, people who are practiced readers no longer subvocalize every word, not to mention speed readers who don't do it at all. Or people who think mostly in pictures. And I believe most people, quite often, actually reach a decision on an emotional level before they finish even half the subvocal thinking they'd need to get there "rationally."

In relation to what both Tim Rifat and Mr. Patch said, I would also like to point out that the October 13, 2017guest Susan Clark, who specialized in 5G research, made zero mentions of it as a means of mind control. And that’s despite having her own elaborate idea of 9/11, and believing that 10, 000 hurricane victims have been chopped up and fed to crocodiles. So, she clearly would not have been afraid to “go there.”

 
Posted : October 17, 2017 1:00 AM
(@shamangineer)
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Microwaves:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/russians-test-a-gun-that-turns-people-into-zombies/
http://www.mgr.org/Bioeffects_of_Selected_Non-Lethal_Weapons.pdf

Psychotronics:
https://arxiv.org/abs/1312.1148

From the horses mouth on the psychotronics research:
https://www.rt.com/news/psychotronic-arms-soviet-weapon-379/

This is exactly what might be expected if reality has higher dimensional space beyond the realm of our senses.
https://www.cnet.com/news/billy-corgan-says-he-saw-human-turn-into-something-non-human-smashing-pumpkins/

Blatantly stolen from Majk's post in 5G Technology: Information and Risks thread:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z99_SzoXZdY

 
Posted : October 21, 2017 4:51 AM
(@shamangineer)
Posts: 1023
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From available evidence about microwave weapons, 5G mind control aspects are possible, although in my mind not proven with certainty to be a mode of operation. Lets just say I wouldn't put it past "them" to have something like that hidden in the chipset and left undocumented. At the time there is plenty of evidence that the way it is being deployed will have terrible effects on all biological life. To me it sounds a bit more like it is at least currently being utilized as a "jammer" - a wide spectrum signal meant to drown out other signals, and possibly to suppress brain functions in specific areas.

 
Posted : October 21, 2017 1:45 PM
akimondo
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Article 1 ( http://www.zdnet.com/article/russians-test-a-gun-that-turns-people-into-zombies/ )

Written in 2012 by Tuan C. Nguyen for ZDnet.com, a technology news site owned by CBS.

For the record: I'm not saying microwave weapons aren't real, I'm just saying they're nowhere near as advanced as Mr. Patch would have people believe. Also, I'm saying this is a VERY poorly written article.

Mr. Nguyen starts his article by writing:

"It's been widely speculated that the U.S. military has been developing weapons with the capacity to scramble brain activity. . . "

Although it's probably technically accurate that "It's been widely speculated. . . " (of course depending on the definition of “widely”) it's also the worst type of journalism. This statement has no source, it's simple hearsay. He then goes on:

"If so, we might be seeing a new kind of arms race. . . "

Again, he isn't lying, it's just that by saying "If so," everything that follows is dependent upon the presumed speculation by the unspecified people in the previous sentence. Nothing new has been brought to the table this far. Anyway, he goes on:

". . . as a new report claims that the Russia government has been testing a gun that does exactly that."

Okay, that's better. There's "a new report." That's interesting. Except there's STILL NO SOURCE. Only later do we find:

". . .Australian publication The Herald Sun reports that Russia's main man, President Vladimir Putin, plans to have them ready within a decade. . . "

Oh look, it's a link. Finally, we have a source. Well, ALMOST, The Herald Sun refers to president Putin and defense minister Anatoly Serdyukov, but that's it. When and where did they say these things? Nobody knows. Why? Well, it takes a bit of digging, because sources-schmources, right? Just trust the media. Hahaha. But Forbes actually say they're quoting the Daily Mail. EXCEPT, if you read the DM article it says:

"Sources in Moscow say Mr Putin has described the guns, which use electromagnetic radiation like that found in microwave ovens, as ‘entirely new instruments for achieving political and strategic goals’."

Oups. "SOURCES in Moscow," how awkward. But I'm sure it's an honest mistake. I mean if you're a journalist, reporting on Russia, you can't be expected to be able to tell the difference between the president and people in Moscow, who're NOT the president! That's clearly asking too much. Hahaha. I have zero training in journalism, and I'd do a better job than Mr. Nguyen. This also explains the diplomatically stupid quote from president Putin:

"Such high-tech weapons systems will be comparable in effect to nuclear weapons, but will be more acceptable in terms of political and military ideology."

It is in fact a source saying that Putin has been overheard saying this. Of course, that actually makes it more believable, if this is a trustworthy source. But writing about it as if it's from some kind of press release, just makes it sound like fake news, to make Putin look bad. This also explains the disconnect from what Putin has allegedly said, and what Serdyukov has been directly quoted as saying:

"When it was used for dispersing a crowd and it was focused on a man, his body temperature went up immediately as if he was thrown into a hot frying pan. . ."

They're NOT talking about the same thing. The above seems to describe a version of ADS. And, in the end, Mr. Nguyen concedes that:

". . . the effort to come up with something that can enable bona fide mind control has proven immensely challenging, despite decades of work . . ."

And he even writes outright that:

"Right now, there's no indication that anyone's perfected anything close to an actual "zombie gun". . . "

Followed by the icing on the cake:

"MSNBC's science editor Alan Boyle says he's skeptical of Russia's claims and that we probably shouldn't expect a brain-frying gun for a very long time: [Mr. Boyle says:] '. . .there's nothing in the comments from Putin and Serdyukov to suggest that the Russians are anywhere close to having psychotronic weapons."

Microwave weapons are real. To some extent. But this article is so bad it borders fake news. It is no more than sensationalizing a whole lot of common knowledge, to drive traffic to ZDnews.

 
Posted : October 31, 2017 9:58 AM
akimondo
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"Article" 2 ( http://www.mgr.org/Bioeffects_of_Selected_Non-Lethal_Weapons.pdf )

Credit should be given where credit is due, and this is another great find! Very interesting as it seems legit. It's too bad it's from 1998, but if it wasn't old, it wouldn't be released to the public, naturally. And it's a bit scary. Because how far have they taken these things in nearly two decades? Much further, no doubt. But to Anthony Patch's sub-atomic targetting from a distance? I have yet to see any evidence of that, anywhere.

I really recommend that everyone read this addendum, but since everyone doesn't have the time, I'll just go ahead and say that there is nothing mentioned that supports the more outrageous claims of Anthony Patch. Such as specific memory manipulation. The effects described in "Addendum to the Nonlethal Technologies - Worldwide (NGIC-I 147-101-98) study" are more broad, and crude, like brain damage, seizures and unconsciousness.

For anyone who listens to Crow and Jason on Crrow777radio, it could be an interesting tidbit that the addendum says:

"In a study of the effect of RF radiation on body temperature in the Rhesus monkey . . . "

For those who who don't follow Jason and Crow, the idea is that things are tested on Rhesus monkies because the intent is to create genetic-specific effects. Meaning the things (weapons, really) should, by extension, affect human beings who are Rh+ but not Rh-, which the "elites," allegedly, are. You can find some basic Wiki info here and listen to the free hour of the show here.

 
Posted : October 31, 2017 10:32 AM
akimondo
(@akimondo)
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Article 5 ( https://www.cnet.com/news/billy-corgan-says-he-saw-human-turn-into-something-non-human-smashing-pumpkins/ )

Written October 2017 by Chris Matyszczyk for cnet.com, a consumer technology breakthroughs site, owned by CBS.

I don't want to be rude, as I really appreciate you taking the time to add to the thread, Shamangineer. Especially when some of it has been really good stuff (and you've inspired me to make better posts with links and embedded media). But you can't go from an ex-rock star's anecdotal story to higher dimensional space. The same could be done for almost anything. A reptilian shape-shifter, a glitch in the matrix, a non-physical spirit entity, a magician using a spell, a psionic super soldier, or a robot with a holographic projector. The leap from Corgan's story to anything concrete, is so long it cannot be made while bringing logic along. Especially when he has said in this interview that:

“The Pumpkins used to play gigs on hallucinogens . . . mushrooms or LSD. . . ”

And in this interview it says that:

"Until recently, there were plenty of mornings when he'd wake up to a stark choice: 'Go eat breakfast, or go kill yourself.'"

"In a way, the Pumpkins' entire catalog was one long, loud cry for help, broadcasting Corgan's leftover pain from a childhood filled with abuse and neglect."

"Corgan was a lonely, traumatized kid, born into a world of dysfunction and addiction."

"He's also begun work on a book about his journey into the idiosyncratic New Age spirituality that he believes saved his life and his sanity."

Does hallucinogen use, childhood trauma and New Age religion automatically take away somone's credibility? No. But like Anthony Patch (who clearly has no higher education in STEM areas, and believes in the bible) and Tim Rifat (who's clearly either a fraud or completely insane), Billy Corgan is NOT a source that is going to change my mind. On anything, really. He could be telling the truth, sure. But with everything he's been through, and the fact that I don't know him, I'll go with "cool story, bro." And, again, to me, Occam's razor places this in the category of ex-drug user's brainfart, long before it has anything to do with higher dimensions. To me an angle of "Weird Scenes inside the Canyon" or general MKUltra seems more related to Corgan's story.

 
Posted : October 31, 2017 11:22 AM
(@shamangineer)
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Explain this one without higher dimensional aspects to reality (I'm afraid hallucinagenic brain fart won't cut it here):

http://www.nytimes.com/1988/06/28/science/probing-the-enigma-of-multiple-personality.html?pagewanted=all

 
Posted : October 31, 2017 6:52 PM
akimondo
(@akimondo)
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Shamangineer, I hope you're not misunderstanding me. I'm not trying to be antagonistic or to come across as if I see through these things at a glance - as if they're obvious. They're not. I've spent hours, several hours, looking through and looking up things related to the articles you've posted. EMF, MASERS, LASERS, Orch OR, quantum computers, AI, Frequencies, Heim theory, radios, scanners, synthetic telepathy, non-lethal weapons, mind and machine interfaces, nanotechnology, nanotoxicity, wifi, cell phones, radiation, cancer, and much more. It's been quite time-consuming, but very rewarding.

And, to be clear, when I make fun of Tim Rifat, I make fun of Tim Rifat, not you, Shamangineer. If I had just read his article once, to take in the information, and not investigate it, I'd have said "Okay" in the end. And, of course, just because he's a crackpot or fraud, it doesn't mean all his information on microwaves is bad. But he's not going to be the one that changes my mind. In my view, his data becomes corrupt when he's clearly not reliable in several instances. The same goes for Mr. Patch and Mr. Corgan.

Also, when I say Mr. Corgan's brain fart, that isn't, in some underhanded way, aimed at you. Since your posts are shorter now (and I get and respect that), perhaps I misunderstand. But to clarify my point, you are, of course, completely entitled to your opinion and your interpretation. And I didn't mean to say you were wrong, just that there are several explanations. And that, using Mr. Corgan's testimony, a "bridge" cannot be built from it to any one single conclusion that excludes the others. There simply isn't enough information. The bridge can be built using speculation, however, and then it's fine. I'm all for saying Mr. Corgan's experience could be explained using a higher dimensional model of reality. And, perhaps, that was all you meant to say.

I'll post about the other articles later.

 
Posted : October 31, 2017 10:18 PM
(@shamangineer)
Posts: 1023
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I get it, I was very skeptical of all of this myself, but the more you dig the more you find. Occam's Razor cuts both ways, and there are pieces of evidence that do not fit the standard model. Dismissing pieces out of hand because they are "crazy" or "theoretically impossible" doesn't help as much as putting them in the "interesting, but unconfirmed" category for further review with more evidence. My posts have been shorter because while one can lead a horse to water one cannot make it drink, I felt I was coming to the point of diminishing returns in the course of the conversation. I can provide quite a bit more supporting evidence in certain areas, but I would rather prepare for the upcoming episode at the moment as I have to search to find evidence from research I did perhaps ten years ago and it can be difficult to find sometimes.

WIth regard to David Icke and Billy Corgan, I wouldn't say their statements are definitive evidence for a multidimensional reality, but I was hinting that the truth is out there for you to find and Mr. Icke is not alone in his view of the possibility of a kind of projective shape-shifting of some people. In some instances I think this is more of an aural effect that only certain people can observe, but in other instances it may take a full physical manifestation - I have not observed it myself, but I have come across enough references to the effect that I hold it in the realm of high probability. With regard to people with multiple personalities physical manifestations have been observed repeatedly and in the case of someone who was "possessed" or "over-shadowed" by a higher dimensional entity how different might such a state be from a shift in personality in someone with multiple personality disorder?

I don't mean to demean or degrade your arguments, many of them are quite valid, but I think you would benefit from having a bit more of an open mind on some subjects and I would encourage anyone to research all subjects I discuss for themselves. There was quite a bit of "rant" in some of your more recent posts and I felt it might be more productive to provide more evidence to support my arguments than to dissect your posts.

And yes, the last post was intended as a challenge. I understand it is hard to come from a materialist scientific or "rational" mindset and find evidence you can corroborate enough to have confidence in, but there is a lot hiding under the scientific carpet that is not disseminated widely.

 
Posted : November 1, 2017 12:17 AM
akimondo
(@akimondo)
Posts: 37
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I get it, I was very skeptical of all of this myself, but the more you dig the more you find. Occam's Razor cuts both ways, and there are pieces of evidence that do not fit the standard model. Dismissing pieces out of hand because they are "crazy" or "theoretically impossible" doesn't help as much as putting them in the "interesting, but unconfirmed" category for further review with more evidence.

I 100% agree. I just don't want to fall victim to confirmation bias. So, let's say I see a "UFO." To me, it would be a mistake to immediately say it’s a flying saucer, go to a MUFON site and conclude from their information that it’s a grey ship from Zeta Reticuli. UFO simply means Unidentified Flying Object. I’m not saying it’s necessarily something mundane and boring like swamp gas or a weather balloon. But it could be spirit-related, for example. And just losing oneself in alien speculation blocks investigation into other areas.

My posts have been shorter because while one can lead a horse to water one cannot make it drink,

You know it's water, but I have to make sure it's not kool-aid!

I felt I was coming to the point of diminishing returns in the course of the conversation.

Please note that my next comment is delivered in a friendly and respectful manner. I can see that, but from my perspective, that was because the sources in part got worse. And, I hope it has been evident that I consider this a friendly debate, not a competition. Saying a source isn’t good enough for me isn’t a childish way of trying to “win,” in fact, I don’t consider that a win at all. Orch OR and the quantum aspects of photosynthesis, for an example, completely toppled my argument that coherence cannot happen in biological systems. And I thought that was great, Orch OR is super interesting! Same thing with the ether idea. Between ether and Einsteinian space-time, I’m going with ether.

I can provide quite a bit more supporting evidence in certain areas, but I would rather prepare for the upcoming episode at the moment as I have to search to find evidence from research I did perhaps ten years ago and it can be difficult to find sometimes.

I can imagine. Please do provide more supporting evidence, it’s much appreciated. But wait until after your next episode! I definitely don’t want to get between you and your best possible presentation. And, just so you know, I think your episodes are among the very best ones that THC has to offer.

With regard to David Icke and Billy Corgan, I wouldn't say their statements are definitive evidence for a multidimensional reality, but I was hinting that the truth is out there for you to find and Mr. Icke is not alone in his view of the possibility of a kind of projective shape-shifting of some people.

I find David Icke interesting, for sure. I even own two of his books, although I've only finished one of them. That said, the reptilian shape-shifters go in the "interesting but unconfirmed category for further review with more evidence," for me.

In some instances I think this is more of an aural effect that only certain people can observe, but in other instances it may take a full physical manifestation - I have not observed it myself, but I have come across enough references to the effect that I hold it in the realm of high probability.

This reminds me of what Peter Mark Adams said about being the only one seeing the pillar-like light-beings around the channeler. And how one guest, maybe Steph Young, told a story about having seen a "ghost," where she saw (as I recall) a glowing sphere and the woman she was with (who was convinced it was the ghost of a boy) saw the ghost of a boy. Or Lorna Byrne, that Mark Booth mentioned, who talked to angels that he could not see, but that she described in ways that made sense with what he had read about them. And, of course, there is the pop culture reference of "Truesight" in Stranger Things S2. Reality is "weird," for sure! But in what way, exactly? I don't know.

With regard to people with multiple personalities physical manifestations have been observed repeatedly and in the case of someone who was "possessed" or "over-shadowed" by a higher dimensional entity how different might such a state be from a shift in personality in someone with multiple personality disorder?

I read the article and it was very interesting andI'll get back to it later.

I don't mean to demean or degrade your arguments, many of them are quite valid, but I think you would benefit from having a bit more of an open mind on some subjects

I’m going to disagree here. I think I need to be more skeptical and more critical. And definitely look things up before I believe them. I realize I’ve been much too forgiving toward people telling their stories in alternative media. Just going along dumbs me down. I could have just gone along with what Anthony Patch said, as he threw technical words around. But that’s his whole shtick. Use big words that seem complicated, and hope nobody has a degree in physics. Alarm bells went off, but I didn’t know enough about the topics to say exactly why. So, I could have been dazzled by the “deep research.” But after many hours over many days, of looking into his claims, I’m more certain than ever that he, like Tim Rifat, is either a kook or a fraud.

and I would encourage anyone to research all subjects I discuss for themselves.

Yes, I agree, it really makes a big difference.

There was quite a bit of "rant" in some of your more recent posts and I felt it might be more productive to provide more evidence to support my arguments than to dissect your posts.

Considering the name of the thread, at least I can't be accused of false marketing.

And yes, the last post was intended as a challenge. I understand it is hard to come from a materialist scientific or "rational" mindset and find evidence you can corroborate enough to have confidence in, but there is a lot hiding under the scientific carpet that is not disseminated widely.

If that's how it has seemed, then you might enjoy this. The basis of my rejection of Mr. Patch's claims isn't just that the technology is, in part, science fiction (and that he has strung it together into an inescapable, dystopian, doomsday scenario, solvable only by converting to his religion) but also that he holds a materialistic view of human consciousness. He's saying that there is a one-to-one direct causal link from sub-atomic matter to every aspect of the mind. If memories, thoughts, and dreams can all be completely controlled by tinkering with tiny marbles in our brains, well, then matter is primary and consciousness secondary. To me, that's absurd.

From my perspective consciousness is, in Bohmian terms, to the implicate order as the implicate order is to the explicate order. The furthest reaches of consciousness are mystical, reaching what has, among other things, been called Atman or Buddha nature. And as it says in the Avadhut Gita "More subtle than space itself," and "neither can it be said it is, nor it is not, what a great mystery!" To me, these things are not the results of specks of matter. And they defy machines. Otherwise, if Anthony Patch was right, we could have samadhi, satori and gnosis by pushing a button on our cell phone in the future. Personally, I don't think that's going to happen.

My view of the relationship between the mind and the brain is more in line with that of Dr.Bruce Lipton. Who says intelligence is in the quantum field and that the cells are receptors acting as instructed by that field. Meaning mind transcends brain. And, by extension, it escapes complete domination or mapping from any machine, particle or electromagnetic wave.

Please don't respond until after the next episode. And good luck!

 
Posted : November 3, 2017 12:13 AM
(@genxgemini)
Posts: 632
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Yowser, this one generated some heat,eh? It challenged me to hear him out all the way too. Like many of you, I cringe a little when folks get all biblical. It's hard to ease those defense mechanisms without a different context,ya know. HOWEVER, this episode REALLY opened my eyes to 5g & generated MUCH food for thought about what is coming next. Spooky shit,man =D

 
Posted : April 14, 2018 5:32 PM
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